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Real members of MyAutismTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

How To Deal With Autism Issues As An Adult?

How To Deal With Autism Issues As An Adult?

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Find people of your likeness for friendship. Same interests. READ alot of books if you can on Autism. Learn the characteristics so you understand why!

posted over 10 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

There are several online communities for autistic adults. Do a google or FB search and find a group that suits your need.

posted over 10 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

I just saw this question.

There isn't much help currently for autistic adults. To the majority of people we seem to "evaporate" once we reach adulthood.

Most physicians are bound by stereotypes and/or assume we are merely weird or crazy, and avoid us. Even if our professional skills are superior to coworkers, if we "don't fit in" we are fired. ADA doesn't help, since we are generally poor and don't know how to follow the proper channels to seek help. And if we did, our social difficulties would only be increased. It is extremely easy for someone to manipulate the situation and fire us "legally" if they want us to leave.

Those of us who have successfully learned to appear normal most of the time find that the expectations for us to BE normal increase, and we are worse off because of the compensation we worked so hard to acquire. The older we get, the less society accepts social deviations, and the more we are shunned.

Many of us attempt to teach what we know about autism, but are unable to reach more than a few interested people. Many organizations with large audiences prefer to discuss the difficulties of raising us, hiring us, getting along with us, or understanding us, since it is more entertaining to put us in front of others as a sort of side show. They rarely demonstrate any interest in hearing our "side" of the story. If we were raised by devoted parents, especially those with money to spare, or are strange enough to be entertainment fodder we may be able to publish books or locate an audience somewhere. However, we are more likely to be abandoned by "friends" and family when we grow up.

If we marry and have children, the genetic component of autism becomes very obvious. We will probably understand our children better than if we were neurotypical, but all of the deficits we have as autistics ourselves will be seen in our parenting as well.

Adult autism is not a happy diagnosis for the most part. In most situations, our positive features are hidden because the social manifestations of ASD are more readily seen, and because society is so very ignorant and biased against us. People want to cure us, make us like them, or prevent us from being born. When that fails we will be shunned, disowned, ignored or pitied.

posted over 9 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

To tell you the honest truth from what I gather, you find the best support online as you find real people that have been through the same things and have alot of really good answers when you cannot get them from peds. and such. Some of your peds have not studied the relation to the brain. Look for Developmental Pediatricians and other help with the word DEVELOPMENTAL FIRST. You cannot believe everything you hear but for the most part like I say these mothers have been there and have alot of knowledge.

posted over 10 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Where do you live? In my state I have a couple of places to call for some needed help. I know there is no such thing as a phone book anymore LOL but there is a site called Pacer.com for mental illness and they have people that can help also NAMI. National Alliance for Mental Illness. I know the advocate is the hard part. If I werent the advocate for my children there would be little help. Sometimes the churches can help. Also call a therapy office they may be able to direct you. Another place is County Sherrifs Departments. They can lead you to a person that has knowledge. If you have a phone book look under county resources Services for people with disabilities.

posted over 10 years ago
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