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When Your Child Feels Overwhelmed, Do They Completely Retreat Into Their Own World, Where They Completely Tune Everything Out?

When Your Child Feels Overwhelmed, Do They Completely Retreat Into Their Own World, Where They Completely Tune Everything Out?

When your child feels overwhelmed, do they completely retreat into their own world, where they completely tune everything out, and will not respond to you when you speak to them? How do you handle situations like that? Do you leave them alone until they come back? Or do you try to bring them out of it? Thanks!

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

my son does that every day after school, goes in his room, looks through books, stares into space, etc...it's his quiet time, so i leave him alone for a little bit.

posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

yep. I've never found a way to bring him back. I just wait. But also remember to implement the proactive strategy which is to keep him from becoming overwhelmed in the first place. Learn what overwhelms them and gradually build up their tolerance to those situations... ending the exposure before they get overwhelmed... then reinforce them handling it. In time your child will be able to handle more and more.

posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

@A MyAutismTeam Member... I do understand what you're saying. Maybe you should tell the homeroom teacher that you'd like him to focus on his strengths academically and the life skills too. Then, of course, as his main teacher (meaning you), you can modify his assignments like I did for my daughter last year. Our children can perform at their best when allowed to. I had to come to grips with the fact that my daughter may not be able to add, subtract, and multiply in her head. But, with the right tools and assistance, she can get through her math course. I modified all of her assignments and told the teacher. They were very understanding. Now that she's back in regular school, I am fighting for her and am her biggest advocate. Because it was her choice, I put her back in regular school. K12 is a great virtual academy and I will re-enroll her if she feels bombarded, overwhelmed, or just frustrated again.

As for your child, focus on his/her strengths academically. Is he/she good at art, music, history, math? Find that something that makes him/her comfortable while learning and let the homeroom teacher know. My daughter's homeroom teacher and Special Ed teacher were very understanding because some days she would reluctantly join her class and was not paying any attention.

In other words, give them a lot of feedback about how your child is performing.

Hang in there!!! It's a lot of work... I know what you're going through.

edited, originally posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

@A MyAutismTeam Member.. I homeschooled my daughter last year through K12 as well. She actually asked me if she could go back to a brick and mortar school this year for the 5th grade. I was hesitant, but so far it is working out fine for her. My only concerns are the school's willingness to comply. Otherwise, she is enjoying being around the children again. Even though her social skills do not match the typical 11 year old, she tries to socialize. If the children become too much for her, she retreats quickly! As for the school work through K12, it was a lot of work, but she definitely needed that time at home. I recommend the school to many parents with children on the autism spectrum because of the flexibility and additional time they have to complete assignments. The only thing is they are still required to take state assessments.

edited, originally posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

We have twin sons on the spectrum, and my wife and I tend to just let them go to that quiet, safe place where they can tune us and everything else out. For them, it involves tapping into a lot of their favorite repetitive behaviors, which usually makes them feel better. Then, depending on the severity of the situation that caused them to need their "deep thoughts" time (as we say), we gently try to bring them back to us. It can be so difficult when you try to do the one thing you really want to do -- communicate with them to make them feel better -- but when they're not responsive, it can be awfully frustrating.

posted almost 8 years ago
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