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Pediatric Chiropractor?

Pediatric Chiropractor?

Does anyone know of a Pediatric chiropractor in Chula Vista/San Diego that accepts insurance?

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

@A MyAutismTeam Member:
Sensitivity to touch or reactions to textiles. clothes, tags called tactile sensitivity. Occupational therapists (OT) could help with this issue. There is a brushing Technique when a child should be massaged/brushed in a particular way with a special surgical brush (OT could provide one and instruct how to do it) each 2-3 hours. However, it didn't help my son. He had an adverse reaction to brushing. But if you want to try, bring your sister to the OT, better to MS-OT (Occupational therapist with a graduate degree) and learn from him how to do brushing if this is a case. Most OT and PT accept insurance.
In regards of your sister 'weird sitting', many kids on spectrum have low muscle tone and weak core muscles, that makes them easily tired, unable to sit for a long time at desk, leaning toward other people or walls while seating. Again, an occupational therapist or a physical therapist could show you some exercises to improve a muscle tone, and you could do it with your sister at home following the therapist's instructions. Also bouncing ball (an exercise ball) is good for improving muscle tone, and kids love it! Good Luck!

posted over 3 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Another great thing to improve kids' posture, calm their nerves and satisfy sensory needs - hippotherapy or therapeutic horse riding. You can find a place where they accept insurance and have licensed occupational therapists, art and speech therapists. It's fun, horses are graceful and kind, even looking at them makes everyone feel better.
Another way to work on core muscles - yoga. There are occasional yoga for kids at fitness centers, special needs associations, YouTube.
Yo don't have to live in a big city or have a lot of money to make a difference in a life of a child with special needs. A lot of resources are available on internet, YouTube, local libraries, special needs associations. What you have to have is stamina, persistence, desire to improve your kid's health and life, al lot of patience, a lot of love. It's great to find a dedicated professional (MD, OT, PT)who would guide you, teach you, help you. But a parent or a guardian, a grandparent or a sibling should become a case manager to monitor treatments and therapies, to advocate at school, to research for new methods in healing. Because our kids are their clients, students, patients, and for us - they are our past, present, and FUTURE. We have to help them, we have to help ourselves.
Good Luck

posted over 3 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

@A MyAutismTeam Member, you are very welcome!
There are two books on Amazon that you could use to do some occupational therapy with your sister. The books were written by Dr. Robert Melillo, creator and cofounder of Brain Balance Centers. The guy was a chiropractor but developed a new intense, comprehensive approach when nobody could really help his own son dealing with ADHD. 'Disconnected Kids' was his first book. 'Reconnected Kids' is a next. The intention of books is helping parents or guardians of kids with Autism, ADHD, Dysplexia, and other neurological disorders to learn and obtain technics of OT, PT, GFCF diet, etc. considering that BB offices are rare, and the program is expensive. Dr. Melilla tried to spread a word and share his knowledge and expertise for a price of books. The books could be available at local libraries. We were lucky to have one of the BB centers just in 10 minutes commute. Although the program is very intense - 3 one hour or one-and-half hour sessions per week for 12 weeks - staff insisted to continue exercising at home on a daily basis. . We made a lot of exercising in the basement . It required a lot of patience and some creativity. The books describe many exercises and explain what they targeted. In general you will need a few balls, a jumping ball, tape, a blanket, a sleeping bag, etc. My son had used a sitting edge on his chair at school from kindergarten to 6th grade, and I bought one to use at home (>$30). That edge helped him to maintain a proper posture. The problem with a low muscle tone and weak core muscles - a poor support for a growing spine. Take your sister to a pediatrician to check if she is not developing scoliosis. It is very common for all teenagers to develop it especially if they are growing quickly. Catching scoliosis at an early stage and healing it with PT is a life saving issue. Hatchback, twisting of internal organs, etc.
Don't allow your sister to sit with her knees in 'W' shape. It's very traumatic for knees. If she fells comfortable doing her homework sitting on a coach with pillows supporting her back or leaning toward a wall, let her do it. My son has used clip boards for handwritten assignments sitting on his bed with his back supported by a wall.

posted over 3 years ago
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