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Real members of MyAutismTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Getting Him To Answer

Getting Him To Answer

I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions as to how to get my son to answer when asked a question. He just repeats the question most of time and ignores me the rest.. I know he'll want apple juice but instead of just grabbing my hand and bringing me to refrigerator I promt him to tell me that he wants____. I tried writing I want____ on a dry erase and with 2-3 choices (he can read). But he just reads the question and choices. Anyone have suggestions? He's five and on the spectrum;

HR

about 9 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member

We cued my son to speak by touching under his chin. For some reason this was a trigger to get him to talk. Even though he can read, associating a written cue with visual can sometime elicit a better response, so try using picture (and limit the choices to 2 - more can be too much input).

about 9 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member

thanks! Will try this tonight.

about 9 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member

@A MyAutismTeam Member that is close to P.E.C.S but not actually official protocol for Picture Exchange Communication System...implementing incorrectly can lead to less than optimal (though might still be helpful) outcomes. I highly recommend every parent/teacher/caregiver of anyone with autism at least read the Picture Exchange Communication System Manual and attend a training. fully proper implementation of P.E.C.S is incredibly powerful.

about 9 years ago (edited)
A MyAutismTeam Member

We made a Velcro choice board (cardboard laminated with packing tape) that said "I want" followed by a blank spot with Velcro. We started with two choices, one that we knew he wanted (cracker) and one that he most likely wouldn't (broccoli) want. I held up both without naming either. He would choose by grabbing the one he wanted. Then I put his choice on the "I want" board, show it to him and prompt him to say "I want cracker". If the words are complicated, couple them with a picture. My son could also read but the visual really helped as well. I also worked with a boy who learned from this technique and eventually put his selection on the board himself and said what he wanted. This is the "PECS" system. If you're not familiar with it, check out this website http://www.speechbuddy.com/blog/speech-therapy-... Be persistent, it may take a while.

about 9 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member

Before mine became verbal he learned sign for basic needs. Sure helped alot. We use sign with verbal and pictures and also do PECS. Now that he's 4 he is verbal but needs prompting and will use sign to communicate what he has a hard time putting into words.

about 9 years ago

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