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Is Autism Different Than General Special Needs?

Is Autism Different Than General Special Needs?

All special needs individuals are different in various ways but autism needs specialized care (training for autism). I am asking everyone here to reply if you agree that autism needs more specialized care. Have you had your child in a special needs program and found that it isn't meeting the needs of your child?

This is important because there are still many places out there that aren't quite equipped and either may not be able to accept a child with moderate or less functioning or they may… read more

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

I find that often general SN programs are geared towards children with cognitive impairments like Down Syndrome. Those kids are slow cognitively but they tend to be relatively compliant and socially engaged. My DD has the opposite problem- she is bright but often non-cooperative and struggles with social interaction. We're having an issue with SN soccer through AYSO for this reason.

posted almost 9 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Applying a label to a program as special needs or ASD can create problems. Rather than looking at a program based only on the title can mean good programs get rejected. Remember, the range of issues an ASD child faces vary from child to child.

When my son was younger, a program that specialized in autism was the correct placement. He was in the specialized program for one year of pre-K, then went to an integrated kindergarten. We tried a year of mainstream first grade. The mainstream program did not work and we opted for a specialized autism program for grades 2-8. When he was ready for high school and beyond, we discovered that he would do better in a regular special needs program rather than one dedicated to only Autism.

The moral of the story -- look at everything, explore everything and then make a decision based upon your knowledge of your child. When you see what is right, you will know it. Your child's needs may change over time and you will know what is best.

posted over 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

In my opinions, it all depends of the level of Autism and General Speciality of the child, that it will required more / intensive specialized services.

In reading some of the comments, I relate to one my child " behavior", currently his teachers have over 18 years of experience In general class and through their years of teaching they have encounters children with special needs in general; yet each child experience is different somewhat, in my case my child is giving a hard time connecting with one of them so I' ve been in several meetings to solute what is best and what triggering the behaviors with one teacher. It just happen that the teacher doesn't connect with him and doesn't understand and help him reduces his behavior in her class, on the contrary it escalate and she end up seeking help among other staffs in the school when it shouldn't. So I asked in one of the meeting for these teachers to receive ASD specialized training a.s.a.p to help them understand his behaviors due to his condition and provide him with proper redirections and positive reinforcement to reduces the unwanted behaviors at school. As I also addressed that now and days it is common to see Children under the spectrum in public school or private; by that i meant to say my son is not the only exception; tomorrow will be another child and these teachers need to have and be involve in trainings for any speciality. Now and days all the public school system received funds for these services if the school provide ESE programs.

Indeed teachers try to avoid having kids with issues, but it is not up to them to have the child out of their class; it is up to the parents as advocate to find solutions (programs, school trainings, direct services for the child, involvement with the teachers and therapies (private/public). I am a believer of the public school setting (FAPE) there are a broad of services out there; although finding it it's hard/ hidden. As an advocate parent; I want to give my child the best setting base on his potential, never loosing hope and optimistic to bring out the best, his intelligent level and decrease his weaknesses (behavior) in a typical school setting. My last resources is a private school and as an involve parent will continue monitoring services /programs within private system and seeking support.

posted over 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

It's so sad. What our children need is Special Ed Schools, like my daughter attended when she was very young. They did away with them in favor of mainstreaming, which in my opinion was a very bad idea. At least I had the good fortune to experience this type of education, so I know what works, versus what we have now.

posted over 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

I had to move to another town/school district because the nice side of town that I lived in had a poor special education program.

They divide all special needs children into 3 groups - mild learning disability, moderately delayed, and severely delayed. Each group would go to a different elementary school. Then they would put K-2nd graders together in one class and 3rd-5th grade together in another class.

My daughter fell into the moderate category and turned 5 in August. She would have been stuck in class with 23 other special needs children ages 5-9.

In her new school district, she is with 7 other children with ASD. There is one teacher and 4 aids, and she also receives ST and OT while there. This was a much better fit my daughter. Oh ya and its just Kindergartners and 1st graders in her class room!

posted over 8 years ago
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