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What Accommodations For An Extremely Intelligent Kid With Serious Sensory And Behavioral Issues?

What Accommodations For An Extremely Intelligent Kid With Serious Sensory And Behavioral Issues?

I'm looking for others who have a child who has issues that require accommodations, but does not qualify for special education because of very high intelligence. What kinds of accommodations have you sought/received? What kinds of support have you found available?

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Per the IDEA & ADA(A)-Section 504: An individual's IQ and/or GAI may not be used solely to approve or deny eligibility.

posted almost 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Fryeafr, that sounds like a really good idea! I might bring that up. I'm also half considering taking her home at math time (last subject of the day, and when she is most apt to have meltdowns) and teach her that subject myself. She does so much better with me than with anyone else. (I know, no surprise.)

Heather, I know what you mean about the waste of skills conundrum. Although my daughter has tested at least two years ahead in reading, and about one year ahead in math, we can't push her ahead because any answer she doesn't already know is a meltdown waiting to happen. I really wish we could get an aide to help with her, but there's no funding. If I can get her into speech (which she needs for pronunciation issues) she'll qualify for an IEP. I wonder if that might make funding for an aide appear? (I know, probably wishful thinking.)

posted almost 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

my son is on an IEP has EXTREME sensory and behavioral meltdowns and needs to be superglued to the intervention specialist and the aide.... (lots of biting). But, they're doing gifted testing on him now and talking about grade or subject level advancement (I'm saying NO to grade advancement because of social and maturity issues but I'm open to advancing him just in math-- his IEP is coming up in 2 weeks, we'll see...... if they insist on subject level advancement I'll agree to it IF they send an aide with him to the higher level group AND they speak to those kids about him beforehand so they know to be helpful and accomodating rather than "who is the little tazmanian devil they're sending over to us?". SO FAR in math they've been doing one on one with him for half the time (either the IS OR the classroom teacher works with him while the other works with the rest of the class and for the other half of math it's been group work so he's been forced to do the work at the regular level. He LOVES math at ANY level even if it's beneath him, so THAT hasn't been causing the meltdowns. BUT having him do first grade math is a waste of his skills. these twice exceptional kids are a conundrum! :)

posted almost 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

My son is in a gifted class and qualified for a 504 due to his Autism. He has meltdowns and/or extreme defiance when he encounters something he doesn't understand. We were able to do a 504 that stated in these times he would take his work to another teacher and receive new instructions, complete his work, and return to class once he was calm.

posted almost 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

What you need to do is look at her weaknesses and have those addressed by an IEP goal. It looks like she needs speech goals and social skills goals. Then have accommodations added in. You said before she has anxiety and sensory needs. Make sure those are addressed either with goals to work on or accommodations. Sensory is usually addressed through accommodations but I have written sensory goals before. For example will learn to identify and regulate sensory needs. Goals for anxiety can be similar - will learn to cope with situations that cause anxiety. Something to be careful of is if they do write goals and accommodations for anxiety and sensory that they don't mention specific therapies. I've found that most ASD children quickly cycle through things that work and don't work and if I write an IEP stating that they will calm self by brushing, then I must use brushing whether it works or not. I write mine very general so that I can use what works at the time.

posted almost 7 years ago
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