Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyAutismTeam

Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyAutismTeam
Real members of MyAutismTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Anyone Having Difficulty With Their Child's School Regarding Autism IEP Eligibility And Suspensions?

Anyone Having Difficulty With Their Child's School Regarding Autism IEP Eligibility And Suspensions?

My son was not diagnosed with ASD until he was 11, he is now almost 13. Prior to that he was diagnosed with ADHD and ODD. After a reevaluation this summer it was determined he has Asperger's and ADHD. He has always had difficulty with aggression, but some of the more obvious ASD behaviors have increased since starting puberty. (More perseveration, vocal stimming, tantrums, threats, entering others personal space). The school has refused to acknowledge that his behaviors are due to Autism… read more

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

...also private schools are not mandated to address mental health issues so public school IMO provides the best source of accommodations. You can tailor his IEP so precisely and in a manner that would allow him to be a well functioning adult.

posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Thanks everyone! We submitted a request today for an independent educational evaluation so he can receive an Functional Behavioral Assessment from an impartial provider. The school isn't acknowledging some of the functions of his behavior, so it led to a Behavioral Intervention Plan that only resulted in more suspensions. One of the functions of his behavior is escape/avoidance, so ISS/OSS is only negatively reinforcing the behavior. We've provided plenty of evidence to them that many of his behaviors are due to autism, but they refuse to acknowledge it, despite having Autism listed on his OHI IEP. We'll just keep pushing, not signing off on anything, and hopefully chip away at their resistance.

posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Continue to fight for your child. You are all he has. The school is mandated to address his needs as it relates to his education and they are receiving federal funds on his behalf to do so. You have the right to an independent evaluation at the expense of the school if you do not agree with what they are saying. Often times the school will weasel out of helping and will treat special needs children horribly... its shocking. Use as many advocates as possible. Contact your local "Disability Rights" agency. Make all requests in writing. Keep a running log of EVERY interaction with the dates. Do not sign the IEP at the end of the ARD; review it at home first. THIS IS THE IMPORTANT PART: with the school looking at your child as a behavioral disturbance, they can kick him out. Be sure to request IN WRITING a behavioral functional assessment and develop a behavioral assessment plan. With this is place there will be a standard means of handling your child (not this teacher yelling, this teacher time out, this teacher sending to the office etc.) with rewards equal to consequences.

posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

I have found that some schools, even with an IEP in place for your child, can get lax and not follow it unless you are persistent with it. Our daughter has Asperger's too, but she is high performing (academic wise) but she has problems with social interactions. So, she kind of flies under the radar because she does not have the 'behavior' problems.

Her new teacher this year assured me she read through the IEP and would follow it, but we noticed right away that she was not doing what was outlined in it. Almost two months later, with my daughter having a substitute for at least half of that time because her teacher had to take a leave of absence to attend to a family emergency, my husband lost his patience and started contacting everyone you could think of in the school district. Needless to say it got a lot of people's attention, but now her teacher is very angry with us and blaming us for her not following the IEP. We are currently in limbo waiting to meet with her teacher, the guidance counselor, and the principal (apparently no one's schedules can be smoothed out yet). It is frustrating.

My advice is what a lot of others are saying; be the advocate for your child; the more people you can try to get involved in the district the more attention it should get (and possibly give you the results you need). It is hard, but keep trying. Good luck!

posted almost 8 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

I also had to make a demand that he not be questioned without an advocate. You may have to involve the Executive Director of Disabilities for your child's school district. To deny your child his accommodations is sue-able and they know it. Get as many advocates as possible. Disability Rights is a great start. They have lawyers. Don't give up!!!

posted almost 8 years ago
Already a Member? Log in