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Does OT And Speech Help Kids Behavioral Issues With High Functioning Autism OR They Need Different Therapies For That

Does OT And Speech Help Kids Behavioral Issues With High Functioning Autism OR They Need Different Therapies For That

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Occupational therapy and speech therapy don't address behavioral issues per se. But, may help with alleviating the underlying reasons or triggers that cause challenging behaviors to occur. For example, a nonverbal child may act out because he's frustrated at not being able to communicate effectively. Speech therapy would help give him the words or means to express himself better. Or a child may have trouble with self-regulation. An occupational therapist would be able to come up with sensory integration strategies.

However, behavioral interventions such as ABA would be more effective in addressing behavioral issues.

posted over 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Hi - Ty is HFA - we started with just OT and ST before autism diagnosis, just "developmental delay," and it has been extremely helpful. Speech Therapy has mainly been for "pragmatic language" component, which you can almost translate to manners. We've noticed that reciprocal language really doesn't come naturally to him, nor does eye contact, so the speech therapy has been super helpful. We work on things like, "when someone says Hi, you should say hi back to them. If someone says thank you, you say You're welcome" - because it truly doesn't come naturally to him. He's made great progress with these things, though.

OT - I didn't know a thing about sensory-seeking-behaviors, but the school OT was going to treat him for that and I've since learned a ton about SPD. Your OT will probably do a sensory profile - find out whether your child is hyper- or under-sensitive to visual/auditory/tactile/etc stimuli. It turns out in Ty's case that being under-sensitive seems to make him act up. (long story short). We've noticed that on days when he wears a heavy vest, he's much better behaved in school. If he's getting nutty, they use joint compression or a mini-massager to settle him down - or even a break to roll on a ball in the hallway.

This works for him because he's got sensory issues, but sensory issues OFTEN occur with spectrum disorders.

posted over 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

I guess I should say that behavior has a function. So, before you can shape or change the behavior into something more appropriate, you must first determine the cause for the behavior.

Speech therapy would help if the behaviors stemmed from impairments in speech/communication/language skills. Occupational therapy would help if the behaviors stemmed from sensory/motor/social impairments.

However, there is scientific evidence that our children do benefit from behavioral interventions such as ABA, Early Start Denver Model, Floortime, Pivotal Response Therapy and Verbal Behavior Therapy.

Each child has a different set of needs. So, your treatment plan should be individualized. You may need several therapies to help your child.

posted over 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

@A MyAutismTeam Member - Toilet training is a very popular topic. You can read previous threads here:

http://www.myautismteam.com/questions/search?ut...

edited, originally posted over 7 years ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Thanks all of you to respond to my question. I hope i can get better insigth when I will go through his OT evaluation.I am very hopeful that i can figure out my little man better then i do now. Any suggestion about potty training? He dont say anything when he has to go..... So frustating...!!!!

posted over 7 years ago
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