Advice for Social Events

Advice for Social Events

I have 2 questions. The 1st one is how do you control parents at social events that you do not know very well when they overreact to your child’s obsessive/odd behaviors (repeating phrases- which they just stared at him when he would walk up and say his phrase, obsessing over an object, lining up things). I had parents that I didn’t know trying to clean up his lines and taking things away from him that he thought he shouldn’t be messing with (like balloons). It drove me crazy!!! I don’t… read more

A MyAutismTeam Member said:

You can't control what others do. You can only control yourself. Tell them he has autism and leave it at that.

posted 5 months ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

I want to add different point of view . As woman who has kids myself also having asberges . Too question 1 . Completely ignore the parents who judge your child . Your loyalty is with your child , how ever extreme the autism . Your child would sence your on his side and love you more and in the end that's going to make your life for filling and easier than constantly having to justify the actions of your son due to his medical condition .

Question 2 events and birthdays . Till this day I have issues with that . I rember my mam taking me I felt trapped and looking around was so scary I didn't understand the concept . To be honest all the people there looked uncomfortable and didn't even want to be there . It's important to let him guide you and if he doesn't want to simply don't take him . Others might say oh it stop his social understanding they talk rubbish . That's what I think any way . Good luck with what ever you decide and ❤️✌️ To your child x

posted 4 months ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

My high functioning daughter liked parties from early childhood up until early middle school; that is when social complexities got awkward for her. So, I listened to her preference in terms of what she wanted and that guided me.
People will not be knowledgeable about your child's needs: but what is revealing about them is their DESIRE to learn and to try to engage. When folks are not interested in learning about your child's needs or restrictions it says more about them than your child.

I say let him be who he is, I found being open about it helped allot, but that is up to each parent. Once I communicated with others about my daughters needs/restrictions people either respected that or did not. I found that the folks who respected her limitations were the real keepers and I gravitated to them.
Hope this helps.

posted 5 months ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

Question 1 Don't let other people interrupt his form of stimming. It is not hurting anyone. Yes he will get agitated when some one intefere with his lining objects up. This is common in Autism. Another parent of a kid with Autism would recognize this. Scripting is also common in Autism. It can't be controlled it is his way of communication. 2nd Question always follow his lead. Sometimes crowds , noise , and smellls can be overstimulateing for some kids on the Spectrum. If it happens see if there is a quite place he can go and decompress. Also it just may not be a option to go to events if he overalll can't handle it. Or you may be in a position tio make a apperaance and leave. Again you will learn quickly what he can and cannot handle.

posted 5 months ago
A MyAutismTeam Member said:

@A MyAutismTeam Member, you may want to repost your post as a different subject.

posted 4 months ago
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